Recent comments

  • Reply to: Ibsen’s Door   by   3 weeks 3 days ago

    This was Hannah's bitter take on the 20th Century at Russell House Tavern, Cambridge, MA.

  • Reply to: Midnight Marauder (Joaquín Simó)   by   3 weeks 6 days ago

    Not terrible, but tastes a bit like an old shoe.

  • Reply to: 1815 Sutherland Highlanders   by   4 weeks 1 day ago

    Beautiful nose, but oddly metallic finish. I used a mellow Speyside scotch, which may have not mixed well.

  • Reply to: Carlota's Collapse   by   1 month 3 hours ago

    This was my mashup of The Search for Deliciousness, Maximilian Affair, and Little Giuseppe. It was created at home in 2019 at served at the Fenix Speakeasy at Nahita in Boston. For more information: https://cocktailvirgin.blogspot.com/2019/02/carlotas-collapse.html

  • Reply to: Doff Your Hat   by   1 month 3 days ago

    This was way too sweet for my palate as listed.  Tried bumping up the genever to 1.5 oz, still a bit sweet for me.  Reduced the ancillary ingredients all to .5 oz as well, and that was a better balance IMHO.

  • Reply to: 1794   by   1 month 6 days ago

    Curated this - thanks Fred. It's good to see you here more often. Zachary

  • Reply to: Prizzly Bear   by   1 month 1 week ago

    I'm catching up, posting old cocktails from nearly a decade ago. Have made many of them recently and they feel like old friends. 

  • Reply to: 1794   by   1 month 1 week ago

    The drink was created in 2004 before there were mole bitters on the market by 3 years or so. My blog post has the first evidence of the addition of them (posts earlier in the year list them without the bitters). I can't be certain where, but Avery Glasser suggests that the addition was made in Boston.

  • Reply to: Banana Daiquiri No. 2   by   1 month 1 week ago

    Used Plantation Pineapple Rum and Ardbeg 10 Years Old as the wash. Nice.

  • Reply to: Commando   by   1 month 1 week ago

    Curated this - this is a midcentury drink from the 1946 Stork Club Bar Book by Lucius Beebe. Revised the drink to match the cited link. Thanks,  Zachary

  • Reply to: Second Serve   by   1 month 1 week ago

    Curated: added ice to Collins glass as per source.

  • Reply to: Apparent Sour   by   1 month 1 week ago

    It was good, but a bit sour. I added 1/4 oz. Kirschwasser and that boosted it to a 4 star for me.

  • Reply to: 2 to 2   by   1 month 1 week ago

    Had to try this for the contradictory flavors (all of which are personal favorites), but was highly disappointed. This is more of a combination of ingredients rather than a balanced cocktail. Barely drinkable IMHO.

  • Reply to: The Surplus   by   1 month 1 week ago

    Sweet and spicy - nice use of Pisco as a base for elderflower, chile and citrus of Aperol.

  • Reply to: 1919   by   1 month 2 weeks ago

    When we had it at Drink in 2008, it was 1 dash Mole Bitters. The cinnamon note of the Fee's would be delightful, but it was not the house recipe (the version of the Drink recipe book I have lists it as 2 dashes Mole Bitters and served in a rocks glass without ice).

    http://cocktailvirgin.blogspot.com/2008/11/1919-cocktail.html

  • Reply to: Earth Mother   by   1 month 2 weeks ago

    I had just bought new bottles of Amargo-Vallet and Creme de Banane and saw this cocktail and felt like the universe was telling me something. Tasty. I might add a little egg white to get a small amount of froth on the top. I personally felt the banana got lost in the mix, but will attempt again to confirm.

  • Reply to: Kentucky Maid   by   1 month 2 weeks ago

    Curated to add mint and a garnish which appear to be part of the authentic recipe. 

  • Reply to: Tango   by   1 month 2 weeks ago

    Just to add to the confusion, the Old Waldorf-Astoria Bar Book (which also specs the aforementioned Tango #2) says a Tango is a pre-prohibition drink made up of equal parts dry gin and French vermouth, with an egg white.

  • Reply to: Tango   by   1 month 2 weeks ago

    The two certainly have similar ingredients (though most incarnations of the Satan's Whiskers seem to call for Grand Marnier or curacao, rather than a triple sec). I'll note that you had a similar "Tango #1" on your site in 2009.

    I don't have Hess's books. The Tango on his website matches the rum-based Tango #2 on your site. The Tango given here is a "potato head" of the other, with merely base spirit and liqueur swapped.

    Hess's site and Mr Boston include recipes for both Satan's Whiskers (3/4 oz each gin and vermouths; 1/2 oz OZ and Grand Marnier; orange bitters) and the latter includes a gin and triple sec "Tango" with different proportions (1 oz gin, 1/2 oz each vermouths and OJ; 1/2 tsp triple sec).

  • Reply to: Tango   by   1 month 3 weeks ago

    Isn't this drink better known as the Satan's Whiskers?

  • Reply to: Tango   by   1 month 3 weeks ago

    Fred Yarm found a real nice cocktail of the same name that is a "Daiquiri variation with a trio of sweeteners: curaçao, grenadine, and Amer Picon:"

    https://cocktailvirgin.blogspot.com/2019/09/tango.html

  • Reply to: The Ticket that Exploded   by   1 month 3 weeks ago

    I originally made it at home with Smith & Cross (since that's the only interesting bottle of rum I remember that bar having).

  • Reply to: The Ticket that Exploded   by   1 month 3 weeks ago

    Curated to add garnish to ingredients list. Welcome Frederic!

  • Reply to: The Ticket that Exploded   by   1 month 3 weeks ago

    Very nice, Fred - that's a keeper. I used Smith & Cross for the rum.

  • Reply to: Bird's Eye View   by   1 month 3 weeks ago

    To me this is just a slightly more herbal/complex Manhattan, which might be great if I loved Manhattans. I mean, it's good, but not great. Whatevs, I'd drink it again before I'd drink a regular Manhattan.

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