Recent comments

  • Reply to: Pisco Flower   by   8 years 8 months ago

    Thank you, that is great.

  • Reply to: Harlan County   by   8 years 8 months ago

    Is this your own creation Dan?

  • Reply to: Pisco Flower   by   8 years 8 months ago

    Your answer for spirit recommendations is at your fingertips, RESOURCES > RECOMMENDED BRANDS.
    www.kindredcocktails.com/info/recommended-brands

    There was also a thread about Pisco on Chowhound in the Spirits board. Alas, I did not recognize many of the recommended brands from my visits to the local liquor store in Boston.

  • Reply to: Metamorphosis   by   8 years 8 months ago

    Yes, it's good stuff. I sometimes use it as a sub for Cinnamon Syrup in recipes, perhaps adjusting the acid a bit. Becherovka is also a nice surprising ingredient -- fun to spring on guests.

  • Reply to: Sloppy Possum   by   8 years 8 months ago

    Yes. Lord Hobo came up with a great intro to Fernet. It's fabulous (if you like Fernet, which I do).

  • Reply to: Celery Sour   by   8 years 9 months ago

    Christina,

    Nah, it's great. Herbsaint is one of those things that will last forever, but is indispensable to a small handful of cocktails, the best well known of which, of course, is the Sazerac. I like the Original (100 proof, orange label) version of the stuff, if you can find it.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Pisco Flower   by   8 years 9 months ago

    If you try the Tempus Fugit instead of the Rothman & Winter, I think that will eliminate the desire to use less of the Violette. In fact, I doubled it, and it was still pretty gentle on the floral notes.

    I don't know much about Pisco, other than to look for a Peruvian brand. I have Guacamayo, and I haven't been crazy about any of the Pisco drinks I have tried. Would anyone recommend another brand, or am I just not a Pisco girl? (I did like it in Peru a few years ago, but sometimes context is everything).

  • Reply to: Celery Sour   by   8 years 9 months ago

    Thanks Zachary,

    I added the Herbsaint and the Angostura orange bitters to my (ever-growing) list. I am glad you guys didn't feel spammed with my cocktail additions to your database:) I was really happy to find a place to 1) consolidate my bookmarks, and 2) share with the hope that I could make a like-minded soul happy. I'll report back after trying this again with the specified ingredients.

  • Reply to: Pendennis Cocktail   by   8 years 9 months ago

    I will try that and post back. I do like my Campari, but in small doses, so this may work nicely.

  • Reply to: Yellow Parrot   by   8 years 9 months ago

    I used Obsello Absinthe Verte. All I taste in this cocktail is anise, and I am not sure if this is due to the brand I have (I haven't tried others to compare) or if I just prefer smaller quantities of this ingredient (I use it in corpse reviver #2 and love it there).

  • Reply to: Golden Gate Swizzle   by   8 years 9 months ago

    First, the KC orgeat recipe is awesome (I should know... it's my take on fxcuisine's version). It's also a great way to meet cocktail-minded friends: the recipe makes 3 liters of orgeat, so you can make two other people insanely happy.

    I think it's worth picking up both Regans' and Ango orange - Regans' is like orange breathmint - it has a lighter orange aroma and a green freshness to it. Ango orange is more juicy, like the peel of an incredibly beautiful orange. 

    You are right in saying this is an addicting drink, though! 

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Metamorphosis   by   8 years 9 months ago

    I chose this as my first cocktail with which to sample my brand new bottle of Becherovka. Even if I only make this over and over again, I will be happy. Delicious, thank you.

  • Reply to: Celery Sour   by   8 years 9 months ago

    Christina, Thank you for the kind comment and the new cocktails. My intent was to make a cocktail that smelled like celery without any celery in it, the way a Jasmine builds pink grapefruit flavors through lemon and Campari. It was completely accidental. I was playing around with St. Germain, and I love both Fernet and the sour family, and the St. Germain + Fernet was interestingly green. Herbsaint with the two of those brings it very very close to smelling like celery. 

    As for substitutions, Sapphire for Broker's should be fine. Herbsaint is probably more sweet than your absinthe. And while you can use BT Celery Bitters, I don't think they're necessary. I think the Herbsaint is the important thing for you to get.

    Thanks,

    Zachary

  • Reply to: Sloppy Possum   by   8 years 9 months ago

    That is some sublime, gingery minty goodness. Disclaimer: I am hopelessly addicted to ginger and mint. Thank you for sharing!

  • Reply to: Golden Gate Swizzle   by   8 years 9 months ago

    I need to try this recipe again when I have the proper ingredients. I used Torani almond syrup, and the artificial almond extract flavor is getting in the way. Guess it is time to make my own. Also, I have Regan's orange bitters- I would love to know if they are similar to the Angostura Orange, or if it would be reasonable to have both. But even with the low quality orgeat, I find this strangely addicting.

  • Reply to: Pendennis Cocktail   by   8 years 9 months ago

    You can try my ploy of sub'ing half Campari for the fruit liqueur, or you could try Zach's historic interpretation, although it might require some more purchases. ;)

  • Reply to: Celery Sour   by   8 years 9 months ago

    I really like this! Very refreshing. I had to make a couple of substitutions based on what I had: Obsello Absinthe Verte for the Herbsaint, and Bombay Sapphire for the Broker's. I had Bitter Truth Celery Bitters, and used those (is that what you intended?). I would love to know if this gets me in the right neighborhood... I like Fernet and anise flavors in small doses, and for me, this is a really good application. Thank you.

  • Reply to: Elder Monk   by   8 years 9 months ago

    I really love this herbal, floral creation, thank you! I tried it with Yellow Chartreuse before I had Benedictine, which was also great. This is on my short list of absolute favorites.

  • Reply to: Pendennis Cocktail   by   8 years 9 months ago

    This is my first time using apricot liqueur (I have the Rothman and Winter). This is a little reminiscent of jolly rancher for me; I hope I can find a more subtle application for this ingredient.

  • Reply to: The Voyager   by   8 years 9 months ago

    thanks, sorry I didn't catch more of that when I added the recipe

  • Reply to: The Voyager   by   8 years 9 months ago

    thanks, sorry I didn't catch more of that when I added the recipe

  • Reply to: The Asterisk   by   8 years 9 months ago

    Thanks for catching that

  • Reply to: Pendennis Cocktail   by   8 years 9 months ago

    I had tweaked this cocktail with Campari, which I subsequently deleted since it isn't authentic. My tweak was to use Campari for half the fruit liqueur. Also see Zachary's note for what was probably originally intended.

  • Reply to: Pendennis Cocktail   by   8 years 9 months ago

    Since this originated in 1881 in the US, I'd be willing to bet that the gin called for would be Old Tom, which has some sweetness to it. I'd also bet that the "apricot brandy" is meant to be brandy rested on apricot (or peach) pits. Maybe equal parts fairly old Cognac and apricot eau de vie (Blume Marillen) would be an appropriate substitution.

  • Reply to: Pendennis Cocktail   by   8 years 9 months ago

    Has there been a change? I'm not seeing the campari.

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