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A Spontaneous Libation for your Consideration

From the Knowledge Vault

Craft Cocktail Making: Theory and Structure of Sugar

Our first installment discussed acidity, one of the primary building blocks of modern cocktails. Acidity can come from many different sources: citrus fruit, milk, wine, and vinegar. All have significant acidity, which helps balance out sweetness in a drink. One of the challenges of working with acidity is that often times the quantity of acidity in a drink is right, but the flavor profile is wrong. A drink that is perfect with ½ ounce of lemon juice will be significantly different with ½ ounce of lime juice, even though their pH are similar. Lime juice has a strong, grassy aroma and flavor that lemon juice lacks.

Luckily, the range of flavors inherent to sugar are much smaller than those associated with acidity. Sugar is a much older addition to alcohol than acidity, as it helps mask the unpleasant flavors of distillation impurities and the burn of alcohol. Sugar was in the first “cock-tail”, along with a spirit, water, and bitters.

The delicate, snowy white crystals of refined sugar at the grocery store have very little to do with sugar in ancient times. In fact, sugar is a relatively modern invention, gaining popularity in the 5th century in India as crystallization technology allowed sugarcane juice to be transported cheaply and efficiently. From India, sugar refining spread to China and eventually into the Middle East, where the refining process was industrialized. From there, it spread into Europe, probably in the 8th century.

Christopher Columbus brought sugarcane to the Caribbean from the Canary Islands. Huge plantations were developed, significantly decreasing the price of sugar in Europe and opening it up to wider use. In the 18th century, price increases led the British to create sugar plantations in India, bringing sugar full-circle back to its origin.

Recent Additions

  • Sea Deck Landing -- In Hot — Gin, Sake, Crème de Violette, Ancho Reyes chile liqueur, Peychaud's Bitters, Sea salt
  • Birds & Bees — Gin, Sweet vermouth, Fernet Branca, Honey syrup, Lemon juice
  • Et Moi Je Te Dis Maud — Armagnac, Herbal liqueur, Maraschino Liqueur, Fig bitters
  • Alberto — Gin, Aromatized wine, Dry sherry
  • Pisco Peacock — Pisco, Maraschino Liqueur, Triple sec, Bitters, Lemon juice

Recent Discussion

  • Re Rest in Pieces of Eight, 1 day ago dsimsion commented:

    Funky & flavorful

  • Re Ellen's Fancy, 5 days ago danoman89 commented:

    Turns out an amaro margarita works great

  • Re The Eyrie, 5 days ago Mixin In Ansley commented:

    Alpine lake.

  • Re The Raging Bull, 6 days ago pedlund commented:

    I took the Averna down to 3/4oz and bumped the aquavit to 1.5oz. Less sweet and a little more caraway forward.

  • Re Teatro, 1 week ago Craig E commented:

    Sother Teague’s cited book does indeed have this as equal parts (1 oz each), while the more recent Imbibe page citing him moves the balance away from Chartreuse which I agree does seem sensible. If I had to guess, perhaps early on he borrowed the ratio from the Bijou (which the book cites as inspiration), and more recently decided to adjust the spec. I’ve curated the recipe to conform to what appears to be the latest version.