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A Spontaneous Libation for your Consideration

Fernet & Jerry

Posted by Craig E. Created by John Gertsen.
2 oz Tom & Jerry batter (see Notes)
1 1⁄2 oz Fernet Branca
1⁄2 oz Cognac
2 oz Milk (hot)
1 pn Nutmeg (as garnish)
Instructions

Spoon batter into a warmed mug with handle. Stir in fernet and cognac, then hot milk. Grate nutmeg on top.

Notes

For the batter: Separate 3 eggs into two bowls. Beat the whites with 1/8 tsp. cream of tartar until soft peaks form. Beat the yolks with 1/2 oz. aged rum, then beat in 1 c. superfine sugar, and ground spices (1/8 tsp. each cinnamon, mace, and allspice plus a small pinch of cloves). Fold in the beaten egg whites.

Curator rating
5 stars
Average rating
5 stars
(2 ratings)

From the Knowledge Vault

In Search of the Singapore Sling

Let’s get some known facts out of the way first, shall we? The Singapore Sling was probably invented some time between 1913 and 1915 by Ngiam Tong Boon, who worked at the Long Bar at the Raffles Hotel in Singapore. It certainly had gin. And ice. It may have had “cherry brandy” (by which we mean a cherry liqueur ... or perhaps not) and Benedictine. It may have also had lime juice, lemon juice, pineapple juice, grenadine, sloe gin, crème de cassis, orange bitters and/or the all-mysterious “bitters”.

Furthermore, let’s set some things straight. First, this drink, whatever it is, isn’t a sling. A sling is a lightly sweetened and chilled spirit, lengthened with water of some sort. This drink, with its citrus, bitters and liqueurs is much more like an early English Tiki drink than a proper sling.

In fact, so little is known about this drink’s ingredients that David Embury, writing in “The Fine Art of Mixing Drinks” (1948) claims that he’d never seen two recipes with the same ingredients. I would extend this, and say that we should differentiate between the Modern Raffles Hotel Singapore Sling, the Original version of the same drink, and the more generic “Singapore Sling”, which may or may not have a lot in common with the version served at the Raffles.

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Recent Discussion

  • Re World's Fair, 1 day ago Craig E commented:

    Curated to clean up including adding creator. Thanks @yarm!

  • Re Brooklynite, 2 days ago yarm commented:

    "Some include a dash of Angostura bitters." The earliest recipes in The Stork Club (1946) and Trader Vic's Bartender Guide (1946) both do. And the one I spotted in Unvarnished (2020) does to. Only Imbibe Magazine leaves it out.

    Very similar to the Honeysuckle and Honey Bee (both recipes appear in Embury) which both have lemon juice but have white rum and Jamaican rum, respectively.

  • Re Detox Retox, 2 days ago HallA commented:

    No... don't drink this. I am not sure where this came from.. and should have used that as a sign to not drink it and to pay more attention to the ratios in which case I would have realized. A tablespoon of matcha powder makes this undrinkable, which I should have realized. Went looking for ref and a bullshit Dr. Oz website as "health" because of cucumber and matcha. May try to rebalance, idea may have some potential but don't try with this much Matcha.

  • Re Rudy Ray, 4 days ago Shawn C commented:

    Yes, I need to post more of my own (admitted in a sheepish tone.) I've been merrily trying others' contributions, but have been remiss in posting my experiments that worked...at least for my palate anyway. The Pasubio one I came up with combined it, St. Raphael Rouge (which is hard to come by in the U.S.) and rye for a Manhattan riff--sort of obscure because of the Raphael that I had to import from London, but found I really like it much more than I anticipated. I haven't decided whether to call the cocktail a Purple Manhattan or Montreux as a nod to Deep Purple's "Smoke on the Water." I might want to save that smoke reference for something with Sfumato Rabarbaro and Pasubio if I find a combo that works.

    I also am very fond of the Rhapsody in Blue. For a fellow Pasubio enthusiast, some other Pasubio libations I am keen on are: Purple Globe, My one and only Blue, Scalatore, and Purple Martin (definitely need the Scarlet Ibis and Averell for this one to truly shine.)

  • Re World's Fair, 5 days ago yarm commented:

    Created by Vannaluck Hongthong at the Baldwin Bar in Woburn, MA.