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A Spontaneous Libation for your Consideration

Frozen Piña Colada

Posted by Dan. Created by Ramon "Monchito" Marrero, Beachcomber Bar, Caribe Hilton, San Juan, Puerto Rico..
2 oz Dark rum
1⁄2 c Pineapple juice (cubed, or 2 oz fresh juice)
1 cube Pineapple (garnish)
1 oz Maraschino cherry (garnish)
4 oz Ice
Instructions

Fill highball glass with ice, then add ice and ingredients to blender and blend until smooth. Refill glass and garnish

Notes

An actual delicious drink, unrelated to awful fake limeade drinks from the bar's smoothie machine. Real pineapple makes a huge difference.

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4 stars
(1 rating)

From the Knowledge Vault

'Tis Pity She's a Corpse

A Short History of the Corpse Reviver

Nineteenth century drinking culture was, in many ways, quite alien to what is socially acceptable today. The local saloon was more like a coffee shop – where (mainly) men socialized and drank throughout the day. Many people started and ended their day with a drink, and took them to waken the appetite, digest meals, or “whenever steam and energy are needed”. Many drinks in the middle of the 19th century reflect the notion of the energy and verve a quick stiff drink would give the imbiber: “flash of lightning”, “pick me up”, “refresher”, “invigorator” and our primary subject, the “corpse-reviver”.

The first reference I can find of a drink called a Corpse Reviver is in Lloyd’s Weekly Newspaper (London) on October 23rd, 1859 in which a theater reviewer describes Tom Taylor’s new play Garibaldi:

Suddenly, the reader will surprised to hear, every man jack of the company of troopers gets excessively drunk and incapable on a couple of enormous stone jugs of some American drink (possibly “corpse reviver” or “gone ‘coon”)…

One of the most interesting things about the search for the early Corpse Reviver is the lack of American sources that reference the drink. The earliest mentions are in London newspapers and magazines, and though they’re always very careful to call them “American drinks”, throughout the latter half of the 19th century, it is almost always European sources who give reference to the Corpse Reviver. Which makes a lot of sense, because no less than the celebrated Jerry Thomas introduced this drink to wild acclaim in London.

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Recent Discussion

  • Re Bitter Branch, 5 hours ago Joe White commented:

    I like bitter drinks,. But this was like drinking a glass of campari and nothing else. No depth. No complexity. Just a lot of bitter. It could be that I chose the wrong nocino (Eda Rhyne Rustic Nocino). Or perhaps Old Overholt 86 was the wrong rye.

  • Re Reggae Ruby, 1 day ago LemonMelon commented:

    Funny enough I experimented with Plantation 5, Bacardi 8, Appleton, and settled on S&C because I figured rum enthusiasts here would prefer the funkier higher proof kick. This might be smoother:
    1-1⁄2 oz Aged rum (Appleton?)
    1⁄2 oz Campari
    3⁄4 oz Lime juice
    3⁄4 oz Simple syrup
    5 muddled cherries

  • Re St Columbus Rill, 1 day ago yarm commented:

    Here is a 2010 blog post that had a direct correspondence with Phil Ward:

    https://ajiggerofblog.com/2010/04/16/st-columbs-rill/

  • Re St Columbus Rill, 2 days ago Zachary Pearson commented:

    Do you have a link to that effect? My copy of Death & Co. has this as written. Thanks, Zachary

  • Re Sex In the Rumble Seat, 4 days ago hrdrck4evr commented:

    I’m new to the home bartending scene, but this one is easily a 5+