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RECENT COCKTAILS: JULY 21, 2011
Dark rum, Campari, Chinotto, Lime juice, Orange juice
JULY 10, 2011
Scotch, Cynar, Pale Ale, Bitters
JUNE 24, 2011
Averna, Pastis, Soda water, Lemon juice, Lemon peel
JUNE 13, 2011
Pisco, Gran Classico, Cynar, Lemon juice, Lemon peel, Orange peel
JUNE 10, 2011
Aperol, Gin, Tonic water, Lime juice
JUNE 2, 2011
Gin, Zucca, Dry vermouth
MAY 26, 2011
Bourbon, Ramazzotti, Bitters, Maraschino cherry, Lemon, Orange
MAY 13, 2011
Gin, Strega, Aromatized wine, Bitters, Lemon juice, Hot sauce, Cayenne pepper, Chili pepper
MAY 11, 2011
Bourbon, Cynar, Bonal Gentiane Quina, Orange bitters, Salt
MAY 5, 2011
Apple brandy, Root liqueur, Bénédictine, Brandy, Bitters, Chocolate bitters, Demerara syrup, Lime juice, Mint

A Spontaneous Libation for your Consideration

From the Knowledge Vault

Making Bourbon

This is the fourth in a series on Bourbon by Zach Pearson. Read them all: Bourbon, Bourbon After the Act, Bourbon: What it is ... and isn't, Making Bourbon, Who Makes My Bourbon, Producer Capsules., Finding the Good Stuff, Tasting the Good Stuff, Neat, Mashbills, Geeky Information and Resources.

This is really pretty simple. A distiller buys grains off the commodity market: corn, wheat, rye, whatever their recipe demands. They also buy malted barley from a supplier; none of the large Bourbon distillers grow their own grains or malt their own barley. Each grain is milled into meal, which takes specialized equipment for each grain, then everything is cooked together, with the addition of each grain happening at a different temperature. Starch to sugar conversion is allowed to take place (due to the enzymes in the malted barley), then fermentation is started, typically with a secret yeast strain. After this, everything is dumped into a column still, where a first distillation happens. This liquid (at about 80 proof) is pumped into a doubler still where a second distillation takes it to between 110 and 150 proof. The spent grain, historically fed to pigs is removed from the still and a portion of it is used to “sour” the next batch of grain, ensuring proper pH for yeast growth.

Recent Additions

  • Songs My Mother Taught Me — Mezcal, Cardamaro, Amaro Montenegro, Fernet Branca, Bitters, Orange peel
  • Calexico — Aquavit, Rye, Herbal liqueur, Bitters, Ancho Reyes Verde chile liqueur, Lemon peel
  • Rare Hearts — Cognac, Bourbon, Herbal liqueur, Cardamom bitters, Lemon juice, Vanilla syrup
  • Long Peninsula Iced Tea — Light rum, Curaçao, Cola, Lime juice, Simple syrup, Brewed Tea
  • Blueberry Patch — Rye, Ginger liqueur, Blueberry syrup

Recent Discussion

  • Re Baby Zombie, 9 hours 5 minutes ago HallA commented:

    Dangerously sweet for the booze content. Would be careful to not make this with high fructose grenadine (or take it down) as this is inclined to lean sweet but with the passionfruit and lime there's nice bite there with layers of booze. Very nice,

  • Re Songs My Mother Taught Me, 15 hours 42 minutes ago Mixed up in Na… commented:

    Enjoyable, interesting, and surprisingly refreshing.

  • Re Camp Counselor, 19 hours 56 minutes ago bkemp1984 commented:

    I used Fever Tree's "Refreshingly Light" ginger beer, which just has about half the amount of sugar. I didn't try it with the regular ginger beer, but I think the one I used is the way to go. It was still plenty sweet since the liqueurs and vermouth have plenty of sugar.

  • Re Patent Pending, 1 day ago TrinSF commented:

    Bullitt rye and Bitter Mile Chocolate Chili bitters. It left a zing on the lip. A nice Manhattan changeup.

  • Re Alpine Bird, 5 days ago HallA commented:

    It's good, there is a weird, pleasant note that I'm reading as coconut-ey off the combination of the braulio and the pineapple. Lots of foam.