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RECENT COCKTAILS: JUNE 6, 2010
Blanco tequila, Triple sec, Crème de Violette, Lime juice
Cachaça, Cassis, Lime
Cachaça, Sloe gin, Campari, Grapefruit bitters, Lemon juice, Egg white, Simple syrup
Calvados, Pear eau de vie, Allspice Dram, Sweet vermouth, Bitters, Cinnamon
Barbados Rum, Falernum, Triple sec, Lime juice
Sloe gin, Sweet vermouth, Orange bitters
Jamaican rum, Light rum, Falernum, Triple sec, Absinthe, Bitters, Lime juice, Maraschino cherry
Cachaça, Sugar, Lime
Rye, Dry vermouth, Maraschino Liqueur, Cynar, Orange peel
Rye, Elderflower liqueur, Maraschino Liqueur, Campari, Absinthe, Peychaud's Bitters, Bitters, Grapefruit juice, Lemon juice

A Spontaneous Libation for your Consideration

The Man Comes Around

1 1⁄2 oz Cynar
1⁄2 oz Mezcal, Sombra
1⁄2 oz Brandy, Torres 5 Year Old (or other Spanish brandy)
1 spg Mint (as garnish)
Instructions

Stir, strain, rocks, garnish with a small slapped sprig of mint.

Notes

Spanish brandy is aromatic with sherry notes; if it can't be found, an oloroso sherry would be a better replacement than a Cognac.

Curator rating
4 stars
Average rating
4.5 stars
(31 ratings)

From the Knowledge Vault

Making Bourbon

This is the fourth in a series on Bourbon by Zach Pearson. Read them all: Bourbon, Bourbon After the Act, Bourbon: What it is ... and isn't, Making Bourbon, Who Makes My Bourbon, Producer Capsules., Finding the Good Stuff, Tasting the Good Stuff, Neat, Mashbills, Geeky Information and Resources.

This is really pretty simple. A distiller buys grains off the commodity market: corn, wheat, rye, whatever their recipe demands. They also buy malted barley from a supplier; none of the large Bourbon distillers grow their own grains or malt their own barley. Each grain is milled into meal, which takes specialized equipment for each grain, then everything is cooked together, with the addition of each grain happening at a different temperature. Starch to sugar conversion is allowed to take place (due to the enzymes in the malted barley), then fermentation is started, typically with a secret yeast strain. After this, everything is dumped into a column still, where a first distillation happens. This liquid (at about 80 proof) is pumped into a doubler still where a second distillation takes it to between 110 and 150 proof. The spent grain, historically fed to pigs is removed from the still and a portion of it is used to “sour” the next batch of grain, ensuring proper pH for yeast growth.

Recent Additions

  • Ten Years Later — Gin, Almond liqueur, Pear liqueur, Cranberry bitters, Grapefruit juice
  • Golden Barnacle — Rhum Agricole, Jamaican rum, Allspice Dram, Don's Mix, Lime juice, Blood orange
  • Phantastic Voyage — Blanco tequila, Sotol, Herbal liqueur, Crème de Cacao, Orange bitters, Chocolate bitters, Star anise
  • Chorizzo Bandito — Blended Scotch, Almond liqueur, Amaro, Ancho Reyes chile liqueur, Lime juice
  • Sea Deck Landing -- Dark Night — Gin, Amaro, Fernet Branca, Dark Crème de Cacao, Bitters, Sea salt

Recent Discussion

  • Re Rest in Pieces of Eight, 6 hours 28 minutes ago dsimsion commented:

    Funky & flavorful

  • Re Ellen's Fancy, 3 days ago danoman89 commented:

    Turns out an amaro margarita works great

  • Re The Eyrie, 3 days ago Mixin In Ansley commented:

    Alpine lake.

  • Re The Raging Bull, 5 days ago pedlund commented:

    I took the Averna down to 3/4oz and bumped the aquavit to 1.5oz. Less sweet and a little more caraway forward.

  • Re Teatro, 6 days ago Craig E commented:

    Sother Teague’s cited book does indeed have this as equal parts (1 oz each), while the more recent Imbibe page citing him moves the balance away from Chartreuse which I agree does seem sensible. If I had to guess, perhaps early on he borrowed the ratio from the Bijou (which the book cites as inspiration), and more recently decided to adjust the spec. I’ve curated the recipe to conform to what appears to be the latest version.